Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

User avatar
bill
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 392
Joined: Sat Jul 12, 2014 7:17 am
Location: Grosse Ile MI

Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

Postby bill » Sun Apr 24, 2016 9:49 am

ALUMINATION
Grosse Ile MI
Located on LakeErie
37' F/B Sedan
1975
Twin 360 Chrysler Marine
Raw water cooled
Hydraulic steering both helms
USCG Master Lic. Retired

Third Owner bill

User avatar
bill
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 392
Joined: Sat Jul 12, 2014 7:17 am
Location: Grosse Ile MI

Re: Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

Postby bill » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:44 am

:D Thanks Jeff
BigM
Re: window track
Unread postby jmonday » Mon Aug 29, 2016 12:22 pm

I have the source and tooling price to do either plastic or aluminum we are looking at doing a 37 ft house boat now. If anyone has the need or a suggestion of what the best material would be I would be happy to order a run of either.
Jeff Monday
1973 marinette single 318 1976 StarCraft Islander 1961 Sea Nymph
Lower River rd
Rabbit Hash KY
ALUMINATION
Grosse Ile MI
Located on LakeErie
37' F/B Sedan
1975
Twin 360 Chrysler Marine
Raw water cooled
Hydraulic steering both helms
USCG Master Lic. Retired

Third Owner bill

jmonday
Aluminum Star
Posts: 154
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2014 2:01 pm

Re: Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

Postby jmonday » Wed Aug 31, 2016 11:42 am

I sent the drawing to this place and here is the closest they have to it. FYI for all.
Attachments
track.jpg
Jeff Monday (Blue Mondays)
1973 28 ft Express single 318 1976 StarCraft Islander 1961 Sea Nymph
Lower River rd
Rabbit Hash KY

User avatar
bill
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 392
Joined: Sat Jul 12, 2014 7:17 am
Location: Grosse Ile MI

Re: Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

Postby bill » Sat Dec 10, 2016 9:12 am

BigM
Dec 10,2016
Just talked with Tom Althouse who is running "Marinette Yachts" for his son John Althouse who is recovering from a stroke. 8-)
He has the window track and slider material available for our Marinette Yachts. :D
Call him at:

Tom, from Marinette Yacht CALL 619-208-6458

bill
ALUMINATION
Grosse Ile MI
Located on LakeErie
37' F/B Sedan
1975
Twin 360 Chrysler Marine
Raw water cooled
Hydraulic steering both helms
USCG Master Lic. Retired

Third Owner bill

User avatar
carl
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 218
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2015 5:58 pm

Re: Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

Postby carl » Thu Dec 22, 2016 3:56 am

I have a replacement available for the old Poly Glide. It has been fabricated through a special order by a plastics company and it is a perfect fit in the tracks. Attached you will find three pictures of the material I had fabricated. A stack of rolls of the .500" wide material for the screen track is on the left and a stack of rolls of the .344" wide material for the glass track is on the right.
Attachments
PC140001.JPG
PC140002.JPG
PC140005.JPG
Last edited by carl on Thu Feb 09, 2017 5:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
1990 Marinette 32' Sedan Fly Bridge "IKOI"
Twin Crusader 350's (Closed Loop Cooling)
Bow to Stern Full On Restoration in Progress
Chickamauga Lake, Tennessee
A boat is always safe at shore, but that's not what its built for...

User avatar
TinChips
Tin star
Posts: 56
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2015 11:54 am

Re: Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

Postby TinChips » Tue Jan 17, 2017 7:46 pm

I spoke with John Sima (Owner of Sima Marine) recently at the Cleveland Boat Show. He indicated that he sold the Marina about 2 years ago. It is now Chagrin Marine LLC at the same location. He indicated that they (Chagrin Marine) do have a source (with tooling) for the window tracks but that the minimum order is fairly high in terms of linear feet of the track. I will reach out to them in a couple of days and see if they have any in stock and the possibility of future orders.

Craig
1987 32 Sedan Bridge | "Sea Jul"
Craig & Julie Purnell | Home Port: Sandusky Ohio
President, Great Lakes Marinette Club
http://greatlakesmarinetteclub.org

User avatar
carl
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 218
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2015 5:58 pm

Re: Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

Postby carl » Thu Jan 19, 2017 2:57 am

The aluminum window track installed in the Marinette boats is a unique extrusion which I have not been able to find anywhere in todays market, I know because I searched high and low after I dropped a length of it into Davey Jones Locker. I scraped and clawed at the bottom of the marina next to my boat with all sorts of makeshift retrieval tools for two days before I called John's Father Tom at Marinette, he has aluminum track but it is not the same extrusion as originally installed, it does not have the T-slot in the bottom that secures the Poly Glide material. I then took to the internet calling and sending pictures to a dozen aluminum extrusion companies with no luck. I called SIMA marine quite some time ago inquiring about the Poly Glide material only, they did not have it. I did not ask about the aluminum window track extrusion as I had no need for it at that time, I forgot to call them back as a possible source for the aluminum track material when I found myself in need of a length of aluminum track after I dropped mine into the drink, it would be great if they have a surplus of the original aluminum window track anodized bronze on hand, good luck and let us know if they have it, it will be a good find and probably the only source left for it on the globe. If SIMA marine doesn't have the actual track but does have the source and tooling I think it prudent to visit this design detail with them regarding the T-slots as they too may not be duplicating the original track. Anyway I finally had to hire a diver to retrieve my 18" long piece of window track that I dropped, cost me $150 (I thought that was very reasonable)and he was in and out of the water in less than three minutes with my track in hand, painful but worth every cent to me. I've included a picture of the original track and what it should look like. The picture is of two tracks side by side, one cleaned with the new replacement Black U.V. Resistant Slide and Glide Wear Strips and the other is a track just removed from my boat, it is dirty with the original Poly Glide material still in it, I pulled all of the strips out a little to make it clear. You can clearly see the T-slots in the bottom of the tracks I write about.
Attachments
PC160008.JPG
Last edited by carl on Thu Feb 09, 2017 5:23 am, edited 3 times in total.
1990 Marinette 32' Sedan Fly Bridge "IKOI"
Twin Crusader 350's (Closed Loop Cooling)
Bow to Stern Full On Restoration in Progress
Chickamauga Lake, Tennessee
A boat is always safe at shore, but that's not what its built for...

User avatar
bcassedy
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 250
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2014 10:05 am
Location: Aurora, In.
Contact:

Re: Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

Postby bcassedy » Thu Jan 19, 2017 7:05 am

Questions about installation of the new glide material into the original style tracks...
1. Can the install be accomplished w/o removing the existing tracks?
2. If so, what would be the recommended procedure?

Thx,
Bill
Bill & Sharon Cassedy
"Sunset Seeker"
'88 32' Sedan Bridge
Located in Aurora, In.
Twin 318cu in Chrysler
1.5:1 Velvet drive trannies
Fresh water only

User avatar
carl
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 218
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2015 5:58 pm

Re: Source for Aluminum tracks for windows

Postby carl » Thu Jan 19, 2017 11:38 am

Hello Bill,
The tracks need to be removed in order to install the Poly Glide replacement material.
1) First take the time to thoroughly clean out all of the screw head slots, mine were all Stainless Steel Philips flat head screws and were packed with dirt and grime. I used a toothbrush sized brass brush and soap solution to free them of the debris packed inside of them, I couldn’t even get my screwdriver into the heads they were packed so dense. Then use a crisp new Philips head screwdriver the correct size for your screws. These are Stainless screws fastened through aluminum track and into aluminum base metal, they are small (mine were size 6) and they have been in there for a long time. They are dissimilar metals and I thought they would be problematic removing but either I got lucky applying the proper technique or they weren’t to be a problem at all. Applying a constant moderate pressure while also keeping the screwdriver perfectly aligned with the screw, start to unscrew the fastener. I know this all sounds like screwdriver usage 101 but all of this dialogue is to prevent you from stripping the screw because they are up in the tracks and hard to reach with anything other than a screwdriver so take the time to prepare properly and proceed with caution. I was able to get all but one of my screws out and with no real difficulty, I was very happy and relieved I didn’t have any grief with these screws. The one I had trouble with just broke in half from the onset, I had to use a sharp awl to center punch it followed by a small drill bit to clean it out, that was a pain but I got it. I’m thinking it was overstressed when they originally installed it and it just snapped upon removal because I hardly put any twist into it when it gave.
2) Locate the stops in the upper tracks. Marinette installed stops to lock the forward pane in place from sliding backwards limiting you to only one pane, (the aft pane) to be operational. My stops were made out of a clear plastic and held in place with two SS screws. Upon removal of the stops they just crumbled in my hands due to the years of exposure. Upon reassembly I will be using teak for a replacement stop material. These stops are secured inside of the upper track directly behind the forward pane.
3) Next, remove the screws out of the lower tracks first, this will allow you to remove the lower track and two panes of glass first, you will go back and get the other three tracks after the lower track and two panes have been removed so leave the screws in place on these other three tracks until you’re ready to remove them one by one. Once you’ve removed the screws out of the lower track you will be able to partially pull the lower track outward toward you with the two panes of glass however due to the boats body configuration around these windows the track will come out only so far before it binds against the body. This is true for the two aft pairs of windows in the salon and the two aft pairs below in the cabin but not for the forward pairs, the forward pairs come right out with no body interference. Once you partially pull the lower track out to where it binds against the body you will then have to slide the track forward out from under the two panes of glass, this is where a helper comes in handy. Once you slide the track forward and free it from under the two panes one person should have the lower track in their hands while the other is holding two panes of glass. I was alone, I had absolutely no help and I pulled it off but doing it alone is precarious to say the least. If you removed the lower track and the two panes of glass the worst is over. Put them aside and move forward.
4) Now proceed to unscrew the forward and aft vertical tracks one at a time. Mine were held in place with two screws each and a sort of glue, it may have been a very thin application of caulk when new but when I popped the tracks free the bond between the tracks and the boats frame resembled a dry thin black glue like material. I had to purchase two sharp putty knives and a wooden mallet to help persuade the tracks out. First I tapped one of the putty knives into the tight seam between the track and the boats frame followed by the second putty knife an inch or so up continuing up the seam until the track was free. I was concerned that the use of these putty knives would leave scars but they didn’t, just make sure you use the really sharp ones allowing you to get into those tight seams. Be careful, this is where I fumbled one of my track sections and it went into the drink next to my boat, painful recovery but I got it back.
5) After you have removed the vertical tracks remove the upper track.
6) Take your four tracks to the work bench and remove all of the old cracked and crumbling Poly Glide material. Get a bucket of soapy water and a scrub brush and thoroughly clean your tracks with lots of rinse. Mine are twenty six years old, anodized bronze and I could not believe how nicely they cleaned up, like new.
7) Clean your glass panes in preparation for reassembly or replace with new. If you decide on new consider tempered glass over laminated with “Flat Polished” edges and “Dime Radius” corners with the radiuses also “Flat Polished”
8) Go back to the boat and clean out the areas that were hidden and covered by the tracks washing these areas clean as well. It’s a good time to sand, prime and top coat these areas before reassembly too.
9) You have also just exposed the screws that secure some of the interior teak trim if you are so inclined to remove this trim allowing you to clean, brighten and oil it, another good opportunity opened up.
10) Now insert your new Slide and Glide material into the tracks T-slot cutting it off flush on both ends of the track with a sharp single edge razor. Turn the track over with the new Slide and Glide material installed and using a drill bit the same size as the hole in the track drill through the holes in the track and through the new Slide and Glide material. Turn the track back right side up and holding it up to the light with your fingers keeping the Slide and Glide material flush to the ends of the track you should be seeing daylight through the two holes you just drilled, this will confirm you did everything in perfect alignment.
11) I personally use two sawhorses and a nice flat 2’ x 6’ piece of pine I purchased at a home center for my work table behind my boat. You will need something similar to work on for the next step.
12) Remove the Slide and Glide material out of the tracks T-slots and lay them flat on your flat work surface being careful not to mix them up and maintain which side is up. Purchase a countersink type of drill bit; this is a drill bit with the drill in the center and the countersink bit above it. Using this drill bit first drill a hole straight down into your wooden work surface, this hole will be repeatedly used over and over again as your guide while countersinking the holes you previously drilled in your Slide and Glide material. Now place your first strip of Slide and Glide material over the hole in your work surface and align the hole in the Slide and Glide material with the hole in the wooden work surface. Using the countersink bit in a hand drill proceed to drill a countersink in the Slide and Glide material. Use caution here as the Slide and Glide material needs to be held firmly in place and you need to find the correct speed on your variable speed hand drill. The first countersink I drilled failed because I was not holding the strip firmly and the strip just wrapped up on the drill and was mangled beyond use. After that lesson the rest went very smoothly. The reason for the countersink is to keep the screw heads from contacting the glass.
13) It is now time for reassembly. Install the upper track with the three new strips of Slide and Glide installed either using the original screws or new. I would recommend using a compound on the screws that would facilitate an easy removal in the future. Install the Aft and forward vertical tracks.
14) Lastly with the aid of a helper, place the two panes of glass and the window screen standing up into the lower track. Carefully finesse these four parts as one unit back into the frame, you will find yourself aligning the tops of the panes and screen into their respective slots of the upper track while you’re trying to maneuver and position into place. Once there you will need to install the screws in the lower track and reinstall the stops in the upper tracks.
15) This all sounds like a lot of work but it really isn’t bad. I had all eight windows out of my salon, tracks and all in fewer than four hours and I was alone. It took longer to clean everything once out. I don’t think I’ve forgotten anything but if you have any questions and I will be happy to help.
1990 Marinette 32' Sedan Fly Bridge "IKOI"
Twin Crusader 350's (Closed Loop Cooling)
Bow to Stern Full On Restoration in Progress
Chickamauga Lake, Tennessee
A boat is always safe at shore, but that's not what its built for...