Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Corrosion, Paint, Through Hulls, etc.
User avatar
shade2u2
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 286
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2014 3:11 pm
Location: Marietta, Ohio -mile marker 172

Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby shade2u2 » Thu Jan 23, 2020 12:07 pm

Seacoat Sea-Speed bottom paint...

Has anyone heard of this paint being used on our Marinette hulls?

I just came across it on a YouTube video. :?:
John
1986 39 Sedan w/Crusader 454 & 1.92 drive.
former - '84 28 Express Hardtop w/single 360 1.5:1 drive (SOLD - now in Uruguay)
Ohio and Muskingum Rivers (Marietta, OH)

User avatar
Tuggle
Aluminum Star
Posts: 133
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2016 4:42 am

Re: Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby Tuggle » Fri Jan 24, 2020 5:13 am

Used a Teflon bottom paint on a hot rod boat years ago and yes there was a noticeable increase in speed. Don't know how much more speed you would see on a big heavy cruiser, although anything you could do to lessen the resistance couldn't hurt. Made the water bead as if it were waxed.
"Deplorable", 1975 32' Express, Twin 318's, Raw Water Cooled, Lake Lanier, Ga.

jralbert
Site Admin
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2014 9:15 pm

Re: Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby jralbert » Fri Jan 24, 2020 11:59 am

The best speed enhancer if that's what you're trying to achieve (and you should for your wallet's sake) is a clean bottom, free from algae and barnacles. If that paint does it well (discourage growth) then it's ok. What I have encouraged on the board is to do actual comparison tests and see what works - even if you have to lay out a few bucks extra. For instance -- you hear the praises of brand x vs brand y. Buy both in smallest quantities. Paint it onto test strips that you hang from your dock (or both sides of one strip). You'll know in a few wks which one works better. Post the results on line here (with pix would be nice). If you're frugal you could put both on the boat to use up the excess for a season then go to the better brand the next.
My case: I had been using brand x for a few yrs because it seemed to out perform brand y and there was the persuasion of advertising. So I ran (or maybe re-ran) the test. Brand Y had reformulated and the difference was stark. A fair amount of barnacles on the X strip and hardly anything on Y - I switched.
Now you're going to ask me what was the winning brand. I sold the boat almost 9 yrs ago and can't recall but it was posted here at the time and may still be deep down in the forum archives but I think it was the Interlux stuff. Expensive but with excellent cost-benefit.
Hope this is helpful
-joel-
former owner 1988 '32 FB Sedan
Chesapeake Bay
twin 318 / 240 hp
Potomac MD

User avatar
shade2u2
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 286
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2014 3:11 pm
Location: Marietta, Ohio -mile marker 172

Re: Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby shade2u2 » Fri Jan 24, 2020 1:44 pm

Not looking for speed, just easy cleaning, less frequent painting and fuel efficiency I suppose.
This is supposedly a 10 year paint and so far looks like material cost would be similar to Interlux 2009E + Trilux 33. Their barrier coat may even be less expensive and engineered for aluminum also.
I like your test method. Good idea.
John
1986 39 Sedan w/Crusader 454 & 1.92 drive.
former - '84 28 Express Hardtop w/single 360 1.5:1 drive (SOLD - now in Uruguay)
Ohio and Muskingum Rivers (Marietta, OH)

jralbert
Site Admin
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2014 9:15 pm

Re: Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby jralbert » Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:41 pm

Brain fart - I couldn't think of the name TriLux but that was the paint I was referring to as having reformulated and doing a superior job. I would not for a second believe any claim of "ten year paint". Sorry to be a doubter. I put their copy (lifted from their web site) below. And notice the line about boats that sit still -- people like us are ones who park more - much more - than they move.
On the speed issue, I wasn't referring to speed as "racer" but just more speed per gal, whatever the speed, with a clean bottom. That addresses your fuel efficiency aim which is what I meant to emphasize.

Here's the ad copy...
"...it will last ten years and is easy to clean and maintain. The hull can be cleaned by hand or mechanically without damage or paint removal such as when cleaning ablative bottom paint. It is available in Black, white, aquamarine blue, forest green, red oxide and light grey as standard. Seacoat has also come up with another first in technology, a CLEAR COAT FRC (Foul Release Coating). The SEA-SPEED V 10 X CLEAR is a thin film Silane-Siloxane clear coat that is ideal for racing sail & powerboats or your daily runabout or megayachts. The V 10 X CLEAR is perfect for new fiberglass or gel coat hulls where an owner does not want the “Bottom paint” look. Properly applied, SEA-SPEED has the lowest surface roughness in the industry (< 8 microns). The low coefficient of friction and surface energy yield a reduction in drag. Increases in speed and fuel savings have been reported up to 10 %. It is ideal as an aluminum boat paint as it does not contain cuprous oxides. Both products are highly durable against mechanical damage and or underwater cleaning. Both are impermeable and form a NON-STICK surface. Note that boats that sit idle for extended periods of time will foul regardless of what type of coating is applied. Unlike conventional bottom paints, SEA-SPEED can be scrubbed without damaging the coating or releasing toxic cuprous oxides or biocides into the water. Whereas anti fouling paint may last one or two years, SEA-SPEED is a non-depleting boat paint that does not polish or ablate. It can also be used on smaller vessels that may be trailered for extended periods. SEA-SPEED does not contain any poisons or toxic elements that become non-functional when they are removed from the water.
-joel-
former owner 1988 '32 FB Sedan
Chesapeake Bay
twin 318 / 240 hp
Potomac MD

Bryank97
Tin star
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Sep 15, 2019 2:35 pm

Re: Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby Bryank97 » Sun Jan 26, 2020 9:36 am

Has anyone looked in Coal Tar Epoxy? Dad used it on his Aluminum Pluckebaum, His Monticello (Aluminum Hull), that was factory bottom paint of choice. Boat was a 2000 (20 years old), still has original coal tar coating to this day. When he bought it, someone had painted over the coal tar with an unknown bottom paint, we power washed it all off as it was failing, and left the original coal tar. When my 32 Marinette needs bottom paint this is my route. Plus in freshwater we do not even paint the bottoms, just the sides for aesthetics. This is normal for most Pluckebaums in fresh water.

Just a suggestion
1988 Marinette 32 Sedan
Pittsburgh, PA

User avatar
shade2u2
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 286
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2014 3:11 pm
Location: Marietta, Ohio -mile marker 172

Re: Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby shade2u2 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 8:47 am

Bryank97 wrote:Has anyone looked in Coal Tar Epoxy? Dad used it on his Aluminum Pluckebaum, His Monticello (Aluminum Hull), that was factory bottom paint of choice. Boat was a 2000 (20 years old), still has original coal tar coating to this day. When he bought it, someone had painted over the coal tar with an unknown bottom paint, we power washed it all off as it was failing, and left the original coal tar. When my 32 Marinette needs bottom paint this is my route. Plus in freshwater we do not even paint the bottoms, just the sides for aesthetics. This is normal for most Pluckebaums in fresh water.
Just a suggestion

I do know of a couple of houseboats in my area that use the Coal Tar Epoxy. One is an aluminum Kingscraft and the other is steel. The owners say that it is used quite often on river houseboats. Neither of these individuals use anti-fouling bottom paint at all.

Also, I know a few houseboat owners upriver that have used any cheap water-based house paint as their ablative paint. They have done this for decades. I'm sure it's not very eco-friendly but they say it works well enough for them...
John
1986 39 Sedan w/Crusader 454 & 1.92 drive.
former - '84 28 Express Hardtop w/single 360 1.5:1 drive (SOLD - now in Uruguay)
Ohio and Muskingum Rivers (Marietta, OH)

Bryank97
Tin star
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Sep 15, 2019 2:35 pm

Re: Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby Bryank97 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 10:51 am

shade2u2 wrote:
Bryank97 wrote:Has anyone looked in Coal Tar Epoxy? Dad used it on his Aluminum Pluckebaum, His Monticello (Aluminum Hull), that was factory bottom paint of choice. Boat was a 2000 (20 years old), still has original coal tar coating to this day. When he bought it, someone had painted over the coal tar with an unknown bottom paint, we power washed it all off as it was failing, and left the original coal tar. When my 32 Marinette needs bottom paint this is my route. Plus in freshwater we do not even paint the bottoms, just the sides for aesthetics. This is normal for most Pluckebaums in fresh water.
Just a suggestion

I do know of a couple of houseboats in my area that use the Coal Tar Epoxy. One is an aluminum Kingscraft and the other is steel. The owners say that it is used quite often on river houseboats. Neither of these individuals use anti-fouling bottom paint at all.

Also, I know a few houseboat owners upriver that have used any cheap water-based house paint as their ablative paint. They have done this for decades. I'm sure it's not very eco-friendly but they say it works well enough for them...


We do not use anti fouling paint either. On the rivers all you have is a little bit of scum. We do pull out every winter and pressure wash. I think it’s an excellent choice worth considering for Marinettes
1988 Marinette 32 Sedan
Pittsburgh, PA

honestcharlie56
Royal Aluminum Star
Posts: 254
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2016 8:27 pm
Location: Lake Charles, LA

Re: Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby honestcharlie56 » Mon Feb 10, 2020 10:03 am

All the shrimpers here on the gulf coast use coal tar on anything steel under water.
1990 Marinette 32 Sedan Flybridge "Hubba" Lake Charles, LA
Twin Chrysler 318's

Bryank97
Tin star
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Sep 15, 2019 2:35 pm

Re: Seacoat Sea-speed bottom paint

Postby Bryank97 » Mon Feb 10, 2020 6:55 pm

Coal Tar Epoxy is an impressive product. My uncle applied it to a kingscraft he had. I want to say that was back in early 2000s, maybe as late as 2005. Anyways it is still in our marina, and every season we are still impressed it still on there. Only needs touched up where the bow where it touches the sand.
1988 Marinette 32 Sedan
Pittsburgh, PA