Engine Drain Plugs

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lsd673
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Engine Drain Plugs

Postby lsd673 » Sun May 13, 2018 6:21 pm

I spent an informative 30 min searching and found lots of good info, but not what i was wondering about. The engine block/manifold plugs are out on my 318's (think i have four or five for each side - of varying sizes)... do these get re-installed with bare thread or should they have something like Teflon tape or pipe dope applied? Thanks all.
1982 32' FB Sedan
Lake Nipissing, North Bay, ON

(For Sale c/w tri-axle hwy trailer)

javalin390
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Re: Engine Drain Plugs

Postby javalin390 » Sun May 13, 2018 8:26 pm

I went through a similar situation during my first winterizing. In order to save some money, I decided that I would winterize the engines myself, and I'm glad I did. First thing I learned was that all the threaded drain plugs, both the lower two in the block and all the ones in the exhaust manifolds, were made of plain steel. that would have been ok if your engines are closed cooling, but for raw water...After breaking off several in the exhaust manifolds, and spending a couple hours getting the four out of the blocks, I ordered all stainless steel plugs for replacement. Ended up having to remove all 4 exhaust manifolds to extract the broken, stripped and rotted plugs ( that was a lot of work, by the way). Since the manifolds were off, re-machined all gasket surfaces, cleaned and inspected them for rust damage, etc...I'm sure glad I did, as it likely saved a lot of headache down the road (like water in the combustion chambers) With the new stainless plugs, I coat them with Teflon pipe dope, and now draining the water every winter and filling with anti-freeze is a breeze, and saves me a couple hundred addition dollars doing it myself. If you already have all of them out, buy stainless and yes, coat the threads.
Jim Elias
1974 37' SedanFlybridge
Twin 360 Chryslers.
Marblehead, Ohio

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lsd673
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Re: Engine Drain Plugs

Postby lsd673 » Sun May 13, 2018 11:01 pm

Thanks for this... from what i can tell, my plugs are all brass or bronze... i am thinking brass ... ok to use? and should i still 'coat' the threads? ... I also note that not all the plugs have been removed, likely because some could not (be removed)...
1982 32' FB Sedan
Lake Nipissing, North Bay, ON

(For Sale c/w tri-axle hwy trailer)

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bill
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Re: Engine Drain Plugs

Postby bill » Mon May 14, 2018 10:58 am

BigM
Hello and Welcome to the Marinette Forum. :D
Brass plugs are fine and use thead sealer. :idea: I would recomend teflon paste for the plug
threads.

bill

ps When you get a chance please enter a signature to your posts. ;)
ALUMINATION
Grosse Ile MI
Located on LakeErie
37' F/B Sedan
1975
Twin 360 Chrysler Marine
Raw water cooled
Hydraulic steering both helms
USCG Master Lic. Retired

Third Owner bill

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JoeGer
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Re: Engine Drain Plugs

Postby JoeGer » Tue Oct 15, 2019 12:47 pm

I’m planning to winterize the 318’s myself. I plan to drain the block & manifolds, trans cooler, etc of raw water. Just so I’m perfectly clear, I’m seeing the following plugs on each engine. One side of a single 1984 Chrysler 318 Engine has the following .
1 on the block
3 small (5/16”) on the lower manifold Left/Center/Right
1 (7/16) on the manifold center
2 large (1” ) on each end of the manifold.
2 smaller ones on the exhaust elbow.
Total = 9 (x 2 )= 18 plugs total per engine. x 2 engines = 36!

Can someone please confirm if that number is accurate... and do they all need to be removed. Thanks!
Joe
1984 28’ Sedan Fly-bridge
Twin 318
Lower Detroit River, USA

barefoot99
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Re: Engine Drain Plugs

Postby barefoot99 » Tue Oct 15, 2019 3:25 pm

Pull the 2 on the back of the exhaust manifolds, or the bottom, (log or center dump) the 2 on the side of the block and drain them -with a warm engine. Put brass back in , teflon tape if it helps. Then feed her 3 or 4 gallons of your choice of anti - freeze.- Some in colder climates pull the plugs again at this point and blow air through the block. Big blocks are little different I think.
Pretty simple - no water in block .
SUP !
1982 32 Sedan FB
2069 hrs
360's(rebuilt)-Edelbrocks, DUI
Raw water cooled
Norris Lake
Speedwell,TN.

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Re: Engine Drain Plugs

Postby jralbert » Tue Oct 15, 2019 6:55 pm

No water in the block is probably gold standard. We had closed cooling on 318's and simply ran 3 gals of pink or green antifreeze thru the engine - didn't drain it. While it was running thru (with my 3rd/4th hands) fogged the engines and as the last gal of anti- freeze went in we began to fog more heavily so at the end, it died. Saved a bit of anti freeze to pour into the intake hose. We had some total freeze winters even down here in the Ches Bay/MD area and this process was sufficient. The rest of the anti-freeze - about a gal - went to the AC system and more for the fresh water system & toilet. I think we used about 6 gals of AF and cut it half with water (50-50 mix)for everything.
-joel-
former owner 1988 '32 FB Sedan
Chesapeake Bay
twin 318 / 240 hp
Potomac MD

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Re: Engine Drain Plugs

Postby bcassedy » Wed Oct 16, 2019 9:23 am

Ok folks, my winterization for engines...
... And please tell me if I've been lucky or this is an OK process.....
( raw water engines - with engines warm and OFF...)
- pull drain plugs on engines (inboard side) and drain. Replace plugs. They're brass and haven't teflon coated since 2010. No leaks noted during season.
- open drain petcock for outboard plugs (pulled drain plug, installed a hose adapter, attached heavy duty water hose [double clamped], end of hose empties into aft bilge using [double clamped] ball valve - each engine. Prevents getting stuck crawlin' over engine to reach drain plugs and the potential of having to be "extricated" :lol: ). Close valves.
- with observer outside watching each exhaust port (one engine goes thru following at a time) and 4 gallons of anti-freeze uncapped and at hand,
close thru hull valve, remove salad bowl's cover, start engine, immediately pour AF into salad bowl until observer yells (screams?) they see pink coming out exhaust, stop engine, top off salad bowls and replace salad bowl cover.
-> repeat for other engine
- Remove thermostat(s), pour anti-freeze into engine block until topped off.
- At this point, I remove the impeller assemblies for transport home. This is done to pull the impeller to inspect and if good, to allow vanes to relax and assume natural shape (replace in spring using FastJeff's schematic/pic). There may be some loss of AF but this just confirms the AF has reached that section of the engine.

This year will be a little different in that we're leaving the boat in the water for the 1st time. She'll have a 3/4 hp Kasco deicer at the aft end (where water's 7' deep) pushing 'warmer' water from 4' down towards the back of the boat (and close in dock finger) and flowing towards the bow (and main section of dock). Using a Kasco C20 temp & timer module with Kasco's suggested time/temp setup. Boat's 30 minutes away and I plan to make regular quick trips there to verify all is well.
--> My feeling is that with a flow of water circulating under the boat, there should be little concern for the water between the bottom of the engine water intakes and the closed intake valve from freezing (damaging the valve). IS THIS A FAIR THOUGHT <based on those who leave their boats in water.>?

Bill
Bill & Sharon Cassedy
"Sunset Seeker"
'88 32' Sedan Bridge
Located in Aurora, In.
Twin 318cu in Chrysler
1.5:1 Velvet drive trannies
Fresh water only

barkleydave
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Re: Engine Drain Plugs

Postby barkleydave » Fri Nov 08, 2019 8:32 am

This question comes up every season and for good reason.

First and preferred method to winterize your engines.

1. Remove manifold and block drain plugs. Use a wire to insure that they are not clogged with mud, sand, rust etc;
2. Re-install plugs
3. Remove thermostats and re-install housing (this is a must) Do not try to winterize with stats in if they are closed the anifreeze will go through the by-pass and not into the water jackets completely.
4.Pull into each engine 3-4 gallons of NON-TOXIC RV antifreeze -50 (-100 if up north in below zero climates) It is illegal to let toxic anti-freeze go into water. NO automotive Green or Yellow stuff folks! Now if you are on the hard and recover it that is fine but you are suppose to flush first before launching and staring engines. (like anyone does)

I have special by-pass valves so I close the sea cocks and then connect a hose to the valve and pull anti-freeze into the running engine.

Shut off engine before they suck dry. (it only takes about 7 seconds to pull 4 gallons out of a bucket so a helper at the helm sure helps.

Do your thing with fogging oil etc I found just adding Marvel Mystery Oil directly into the carbs then turning over the engine with Coil wire off a few revs pulls the oil into the cyl. I do not run the engine. I have used this method now for 15 years with no problems.

Option II

Last year due to health issue I was not able to crawl around the engines pulling drain plugs. Over the past 13 seasons I never found much gunk when I drained the manifolds anyway. So I did not pull the drain plugs last fall or this year either. I warmed up engines, removed stats and sucked the anit-freeze into the running engines. I had a helper also watch the exhaust and at 2 gallons it was pure red anti-freeze. I did put 4 gallons in each engine.

Now maybe next fall I might pull the plugs at least on the inboard sides to check for junk.

Option II worked for me your results may vary so it is not an endorsement. I know my system. Now if I had closed cooling then it is a snap!
1987 Marinette 29 FB Sedan
Retired Boat Accident UL and USCG trained investigator
Retired USCG Captain

barkleydave
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Posts: 378
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Re: Engine Drain Plugs

Postby barkleydave » Fri Nov 08, 2019 8:46 am

bcassedy wrote:Ok folks, my winterization for engines...
... And please tell me if I've been lucky or this is an OK process.....
( raw water engines - with engines warm and OFF...)
- pull drain plugs on engines (inboard side) and drain. Replace plugs. They're brass and haven't teflon coated since 2010. No leaks noted during season.
- open drain petcock for outboard plugs (pulled drain plug, installed a hose adapter, attached heavy duty water hose [double clamped], end of hose empties into aft bilge using [double clamped] ball valve - each engine. Prevents getting stuck crawlin' over engine to reach drain plugs and the potential of having to be "extricated" :lol: ). Close valves.
- with observer outside watching each exhaust port (one engine goes thru following at a time) and 4 gallons of anti-freeze uncapped and at hand,
close thru hull valve, remove salad bowl's cover, start engine, immediately pour AF into salad bowl until observer yells (screams?) they see pink coming out exhaust, stop engine, top off salad bowls and replace salad bowl cover.
-> repeat for other engine
- Remove thermostat(s), pour anti-freeze into engine block until topped off.
- At this point, I remove the impeller assemblies for transport home. This is done to pull the impeller to inspect and if good, to allow vanes to relax and assume natural shape (replace in spring using FastJeff's schematic/pic). There may be some loss of AF but this just confirms the AF has reached that section of the engine.

This year will be a little different in that we're leaving the boat in the water for the 1st time. She'll have a 3/4 hp Kasco deicer at the aft end (where water's 7' deep) pushing 'warmer' water from 4' down towards the back of the boat (and close in dock finger) and flowing towards the bow (and main section of dock). Using a Kasco C20 temp & timer module with Kasco's suggested time/temp setup. Boat's 30 minutes away and I plan to make regular quick trips there to verify all is well.
--> My feeling is that with a flow of water circulating under the boat, there should be little concern for the water between the bottom of the engine water intakes and the closed intake valve from freezing (damaging the valve). IS THIS A FAIR THOUGHT <based on those who leave their boats in water.>?

Bill


Bill you certainly will have no problem with the way you are doing it. Our Sea Cocks are ball valves not gate so you do not have to worry about them freezing while in the water over the winter. I do make sure that I have antifreeze in the line going down to the valve. My boat has been in the water down here on Lake Barkley for 15 years with no issues. I have used a deicer a couple of years. (have not needed that past 4) Then I only had it one a couple of times in late January/Feb. Great that you take the impellers out. I leave mine in case I need to start it move it in an emergency. I replace my impellers every third season anyway. Barkleydave
1987 Marinette 29 FB Sedan
Retired Boat Accident UL and USCG trained investigator
Retired USCG Captain